Premise Based Voice Elements

3- premise features

Voice Elements gives you the flexibility to run your application in our cloud, or run on your own server.

Overview

Deploying to your own equipment can give you the ultimate in flexibility by allowing to integrate your Voice Elements applications to your existing equipment.

Scalable

Voice Elements can run more than 1000 concurrent calls with a single-server.

Proven

Voice Elements powers software that runs tens of thousands of ports, handling hundreds of thousands of calls daily.

Flexible

Voice Elements can connect to a variety of different hardware and software-based PBXs from a variety of vendors such as Avaya and Cisco.

How hard is it to move from the cloud to my own server?

It’s easy. Our installer includes a step-by-step wizard to easily configure your own server. Once you install the server, you’ll need to modify which server your application connects to — we recommend placing this setting in a configuration file, so you don’t need to make any code changes.

How much does it cost to move to my own system?

We charge a one time licensing fee to move from our cloud based system to your own server.

Pricing is based on the number of concurrent calls that you would like to make (or receive) on your server at any given time.

How do I connect to analog lines, PRI lines, or other TDM Equipment?

We typically recommend that our customers purchase gateway equipment. We can provide you with a list of recommended products to get you up and connected to your TDM equipment.

Can I run inside of a virtual machine?

Yes, because VoIP traffic needs to be sent real time, you’ll want to read this link for more information.

Is there anything else I should know?

You will need a way to connect calls to your server. There are a variety of ways to do this depending on your situation. You can connect to a SIP carrier, SIP Gateway, or PBX. If you will be placing calls to a SIP carrier over the internet, you may need to make sure you use a router that can handle the load placed onto it by VoIP calls.